Friday, January 29, 2016

Reading Short Fiction: 'The Quinceañera Text'


Introducing Point of View  One thing we will be focusing on was we begin to read the short fiction story "The Quinceañera Text" is explaining how the author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in the text. But what is point of view and how can we begin to determine the type of point of view a story is being told from? Let's watch the video below for an introduction. 


Guided Reading: "The Quinceañera Text"  As we read the short story "The Quinceañera Text" (which can be found here) together, we will stop periodically to discuss the important literary elements and devices present in the story, including characters, point of view, setting, symbolism, and plot. You will make note of these using the document Literary Elements and Devices ("The Quinceañera Text") located in your Language Arts Google Classroom.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

The District Benchmark Assessment (Round 2)



The District Benchmark Assessment  Today you will be taking the another online District Benchmark Assessment in an attempt to measure some of what you have learned so far this school year. This is a very important test and I expect you to try your best. Directions on how to log in the Illuminate Student Portal and get started with your test can be found below. 

Step 1: Go to www.pvusd.net. Click on Students, then scroll down to Illuminate Home Portal.   
Step 2: Students must select the Student tab on the Illuminate Home Connection screen.

Step 3: Login. 


Step 4: Students select Assessments from under the list located under "What Would You Like to See." 

Step 5: Students click on the link for 2015-2016_PVUSD_ELA_Gr 6_Benchmark #2 under "Pending Online Assessment" to select your exam. 

Step 6: Students click Begin Test to start the exam. 



Step 7: You may 'Pause' the test at anytime by clicking the 'pause' button if you need to stop the test and then resume it later. When you are ready to finish the test once and for all, click Review/Finish and review your responses one final time before submitting your exam to be scored. 

Note: If you don't finish the test today, you will have an opportunity to complete it tomorrow.  If you finish early, you may silent read or work on either of your Text Evidence (Paired Texts)  or the Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) assignments.

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Remember to complete the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts), both of which will be due Friday, January 29.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Nonfiction 'Paired Texts' Assessment and Sacred Reading


Assessment: 'Paired Texts' Quiz  Today you have the opportunity to demonstrate what you know about the central ideas, details, and text evidence of the nonfiction paired texts "Playing with Pain" and "Travel Team Heartbreak" by taking an online quiz, which can be found here. You are encouraged to refer back to the texts of the related article and essay at any point during the quiz (a link is here). I will read each question and answer set aloud to you and then provide you with the time you need to complete your assessment. After you have submitted your quiz, you may move on to the activity featured below. 

Sacred Reading Time  If time permits today, I want to offer you some uninterrupted class time to simply read and commune with your books. Some of you will invited to read outside, others in a cozy corner of the room, while most of you will hopefully become enraptured by the words on your pages right at your desks. Enjoy this time! 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Remember to complete the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts), both of which will be due Friday, January 29.

Monday, January 25, 2016

Happy Monday!


 Today's Learning Objectives   * Determine central ideas of a text. * Read closely to determine what they text says and cite specific textual evidence. * Analyze how two or more texts address similar topics.


Sacred Reading Time  I'd like to begin today by offering you some uninterrupted class time to simply read and commune with your books. Some of you will invited to reading a cozy corner of the room, while most of you will hopefully become enraptured by the words on your pages right at your desks. Enjoy this time!

Nonfiction Paired Texts: Focus on Identifying Central Ideas and Text Evidence  Today we will continue to focus on identifying central ideas and providing text evidence in each using the nonfiction paired texts "Playing with Pain" and "Travel Team Heartbreak" (which you should be able to access here). Remember that a central idea of a text is one of the main points the author is making. (Sometimes a central idea is called a main idea.) A central idea can always be supported with details from the text. When you write about something you have read, you need to use supporting evidence‚ or text evidence, to back up whatever point you are making. Most of your evidence will be details from the text you are writing about.

You can still find the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts) in your Language Arts Google Classroom. Remember that these assignments will be due next Friday, January 29. Tomorrow you will be taking a quiz on your understanding of these paired texts and the concepts of central ideas and text evidence. 

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Complete the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts), both of which will be due Friday, January 29.

Friday, January 22, 2016

100 Word Challenge Publishing and Identifying Central Ideas and Text Evidence


 Today's Learning Objectives   * Determine central ideas of a text. * Read closely to determine what they text says and cite specific textual evidence. * Analyze how two or more texts address similar topics.


100 Word Challenge: Finishing Touches and Publishing Happy Friday! It's just about time to publish this week's 100 Word Challenge. Please look over your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story carefully. Did you skillfully integrate the words the five words (red, hard, mountain, floated, and umbrella) from this week's prompt? Does your story flow naturally from beginning to end? Did you use descriptive words and sensory details? Did you carefully review your spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar? Did you make sure your verb tenses are consistent and that you have employed correct and varied sentence structures? Please make sure your piece of writing is good as it can be.

Next, it's publishing time! Copy your story from your Google Doc and then login to Kidblog. Make a new post. This week you once again get to title your story whatever you find fitting. Paste your story. Highlight the five words. Consider adding a picture. Finally, click 'Publish' and copy the link to your published story.


Now it's time to share your story with the 100 Word Challenge. In order to login, I will provide you a working Username and Password.


Next, fill out the form similar to the one below, making sure to include the link to your Kidblog story. Click 'Submit' when you're done. Congratulations! You are now an internationally published writer!

 
Nonfiction Paired Texts: Focus on Identifying Central Ideas and Text Evidence  Now that we've read the article "Playing with Pain" and the essay "Travel Team Heartbreak" (which you should be able to access here), we will focus on identifying central ideas and providing text evidence in each. Remember that a central idea of a text is one of the main points the author is making. (Sometimes a central idea is called a main idea.) A central idea can always be supported with details from the text. When you write about something you have read, you need to use supporting evidence‚ or text evidence, to back up whatever point you are making. Most of your evidence will be details from the text you are writing about.

You can find the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts) in your Language Arts Google Classroom. These assignments will be due next Friday, January 29.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Identifying Central Ideas and Text Evidence in Nonfiction Paired Texts


 

 Today's Learning Objectives   * Determine central ideas of a text. * Read closely to determine what they text says and cite specific textual evidence. * Analyze how two or more texts address similar topics.


Paired Texts Introduction  A thought-provoking nonfiction article about the problem of overuse injuries is paired with a moving personal essay about the author’s son coping with rejection in basketball. You can find both the article "Playing with Pain" and the essay "Travel Team Heartbreak" here (an accesss code will be provided).

Vocabulary Preview  Let's preview some of the key vocabulary that will be featured in these paired texts. Below you will find a list of tricky words featured in the article and essay, as well as definitions and example sentences. Each group will be responsible for mastering one word and teaching it to the class.  

 
Focus on Identifying Central Ideas and Text Evidence  As we read the paired texts together our focus will be on identifying central ideas and providing text evidence. Remember that a central idea of a text is one of the main points the author is making. (Sometimes a central idea is called a main idea.) A central idea can always be 
supported with details from the text. 

When you write about something you have read, you need to use supporting evidence‚ or text evidence, to back up whatever point you are making. Most of your evidence will be details from the text you are writing about.

You can find the assignments Central Ideas and Details (Paired Texts) and Text Evidence (Paired Texts) in your Language Arts Google Classroom.  

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Complete work on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story, which we will publish on tomorrow, Friday, January 22. (3.) Complete work on your Newsela Article, which is due on tomorrow, Friday, January 22.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

100 Word Challenge and Newsela


How will you skillfully integrate these 5 words into this week's 100 Word Challenge?





 Today's Learning Objective  Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.


100 Word Challenge: Drafting  Enjoy some time today to continue drafting your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story. Are you skillfully incorporating the words from this week's prompt? Do you have a clear beginning, middle, and an end? Are making a point to include precise words and descriptive details? Continue to work at becoming the very best writer you can be!

Reading Informational Text: Newsela Article In your Language Arts Google Classroom you will find a link to the Newsela article "Knees are being injured more often, especially in girls." Click the link, set the reading level to to 820L (5th grade), and read the article carefully. Next, take the quiz and then write the constructed response paragraph in which explain the central idea of the article and use at least two details from the article to support your response. 


Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Continue working on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story, which we will publish on Friday, January 22. (3.) Complete work on your Newsela Article, which is due on Friday, January 22.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Peer Editing, Poem Publishing, and a 100 Word Challenge

I hope each of you enjoyed your Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and took at least a moment yesterday to reflect on Dr. King's message of non-violence, peace, and social justice. May his dream live on through the actions of each of us. 


Peer Editing and Revision  Writing is a process that includes many stages, which includes brainstorming, drafting, revising, editing, and ultimately publishing. Most of us are currently in the middle of that process now with regards to our  "I Am From" Poem. As we seek to improve our writing and make each piece as good as it possible be, it's important to remember how important editing is as part of the writing process. No published author writes a perfect piece of writing the first time through; they are constantly revising and editing until they get it just right. 

Today you will have an opportunity to share you current piece of writing (in whatever state it's in) with one of your peers in class. Your task when reviewing a partner's writing is to both help with basic editing and to provide constructive feedback that is helpful to the writer. 

After you know who you will be sharing your writing with, click on "Share at the top of your document. Next, enter their full name and click "Done." The document should now be available in the "Shared with Me" or "Incoming" section of your Google Drive.

 

What things should you be looking for as your read your classmate's work? If something is unclear to you, ask about it. If you can think of a more descriptive or precise word to use, suggest it. If your partner made a basic mistake with capitalization, spelling, or punctuation, point it out

When commenting on another's writing remember some of these basic guidelines: 

There are a couple of ways to make suggestions and comments. You can use the "Suggesting" function within Google Docs, where you can make suggested edits that the writer can then later accept or reject. 



Secondly, you could also simply highlight text and make comments and suggestions that way. 


Finally, your peer editing should include a balance of corrections, suggestions, and compliments. Positive feedback is important too! 


"I Am From" Poem: Finishing Touches and Publishing  Now it's time to make sure your "I Am From" Poem is ready to be published. Please read your poem aloud to yourself. How does it sound? Did you carefully select descriptive words that connect with your reader and allow them to visualize your world? Does it flow? Before publishing, make sure you remove the suggestions in parenthesis from the original scaffold. Also, make sure to add your byline at the beginning or end of your poem (e.g., By Matt). 

Next, let's publish your poem! Copy the text of your poem from the Google Doc and then head over to Kidblog. Make a new post and title it "I Am From" Poem. Paste the text of your poem. Make sure that it looks they you want it to. Finally, click "Publish". Congratulations! You have published another piece of writing! My hope is to have you read your poems aloud to the class by the end of this week, so you may want to begin practicing.

A New 100 Word Challenge:  Red   Hard   Mountain   Floated   Umbrella  This week's challenge is another unique one. It doesn't involve a picture or a designated phrase, but it's rather made up of a random assortment of five words. Read more about the challenge below. 

You can find the assignment 100 Word Challenge: Five Words in your Language Arts folders. How will you strategically weave this 5 words throughout your story, while still constructing a logical narrative? What will these specially chosen words add to your story? Remember the words can be used in whatever order you see fit. Also, remember as you write to continue developing your imagery by using precise words, sensory details, and literary devices such as similes. We publish on Friday. Have fun!   

Homework  (1.) Read your A.R. book at home for at least 30 minutes and, if you choose, make a reading log entry using the Digital Reading Log. (Remember you must have made at least one entry by the end of the day Friday.)  (2.) Continue working on your 100 Word Challenge: Five Words story, which we will publish on Friday, January 22.